Can Coffee Rev Up Your Workout?

See my New York Times letter commenting on the effects of caffeine on exercise! Your inherent (genetically coded) rate of metabolizing caffeine has an influence on its effect on exercise.  That rate is determined by how rapidly or slowly working the enzyme is that processes caffeine.  The particular enzyme responsible is known as CYP4501A2 (catchy […]

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Treatment for Excessive Worry

Dr. Neal Ranen, M.D. Offers Anxiety Treatment in Baltimore Fear serves as a filter that assists in the recognition of danger. It heightens the reflexes and increases mental alertness. The fear response was particularly important in the early days of humankind when there was a need to be vigilant for mortal threats, such as suddenly […]

Effective Management of ADHD

Resume Normalcy in Life with ADHD Management Living with ADHD presents a set of challenges that are difficult for many to understand. This is particularly so if you haven’t personally experienced the symptoms and circumstances surrounding the condition. Parents, students, instructors, professionals, athletes and people from many other walks of life live with ADHD each […]

Using Genetic Testing for Psychiatric Medication Selection

Genetic Testing for Psychiatric Medication in Baltimore I am a big fan of genetic testing and frequently utilize it in my practice. It allows for your unique genetic profile to be considered in medication decision-making. The DNA testing of relevant genes reveals how your body processes medication, and how well various medications may work for […]

The post Using Genetic Testing for Psychiatric Medication Selection appeared first on Baltimore Psychiatric Services – Dr. Neal Ranen, M.D..

I’m sorry for all the times my depression and anxiety made me a bit of a rubbish friend

Since I’ve started being honest about my mental health, I’ve noticed that my relationships have changed – mostly for the better.

There’s more trust there. We’re able to talk about bigger things. Now that I’ve opened up, the people around me have started to open up, too.

And it’s made me think about how much time I’ve spent being not-the-best friend when I wasn’t open about what I was dealing with (meaning depression, anxiety, panic attacks, and obsessive thoughts).

I want to say sorry.

I’m sorry for all the times I didn’t message you back because I overthought a response, then decided that ignoring you entirely would make you hate me less than taking a few hours to send a text.

METRO GRAPHICS
(Picture: Ella Byworth for Metro.co.uk)

I’m sorry I declined your calls, scared to reveal that yes, you had woken me up, because I’m still in bed at 3pm on a Sunday.

I’m sorry I backed out of plans at the last minute because after getting ready much too early, my anxiety jumped in to remind me of all the dangers outside my house.

I’m sorry for lying, for covering things up, for pretending I had food poisoning or other commitments.

Some other stuff I don’t feel proud of:

All the times I pushed you away because I didn’t want you to notice that I wasn’t being myself. The times I got angry for no reason, was irritable, and decided the easiest option was to cut you out of my life instead of letting you in.

Read More: http://metro.co.uk/2017/04/10/im-sorry-for-all-the-times-my-depression-and-anxiety-made-me-a-bit-of-a-rubbish-friend-6564335

Related Article: Self-Love Quote By Sandra Bellamy